CSO open letter to Vice-President Timmermans on the 2030 Agenda

2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development


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Dear First Vice-President Timmermans, We, European Civil Society Organisations working on both international and domestic EU policies across a variety of sectors ranging from Youth, Sustainability, Social Justice, Fair Trade, International cooperation, Health, Culture, Environment, Gender Equality, Migration, Climate Change, Local Democracy, Human Rights and Media Development, are writing to you in your capacity as Vice-President of the European Commission, mandated with the horizontal responsibility for sustainable development.

At the UN Summit in New York taking place from 25-27 of September, Heads of State and Government will adopt the universal, people- and planet-centered 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development (‘Agenda 2030’). As European civil society, we now expect the EU to match the ambition of this Agenda with a clear EU implementation strategy, which reflects the integrated, interlinked and comprehensive nature of the Agenda, in order to ensure well-being for all within planetary boundaries.

We welcome the mapping exercise that you have initiated within the Commission to analyse where the EU has appropriate policies in place to implement Agenda 2030 and where there are gaps. This exercise is a first important step in order to elaborate an EU strategy to implement Agenda 2030. The EU strategy must build on your mapping exercise and cover all Goals and targets of the Agenda.

GCAP Global Assembly 2015


The GCAP Global Assembly 2015 will take place on the 27th and 28th of September 2015 in New York.  

Please find the invitation letter from our three co-chairs below. We hope to see many of you in New York!




GCAP response to the Addis Ababa Action Agenda (AAAA)


While we welcome the objective of the Addis Ababa Action Agenda (AAAA) of achieving ‘equitable global economic system in which no country or person is left behind’ in its introductory paragraph, so also the mention of the productive employment, decent work and the social protection system, we fear that they may remain as mere rhetoric. While promising to end hunger, poverty and inequality, it has not addressed the structural aspects of the economy responsible for perpetuation of the same. Excessive importance given to the private capital for financing development legitimises the ongoing withdrawal of the state from providing essential services like education, health, water and sanitation and other sectors. While the PPP model has made quality education and health care almost out of reach for the people living in poverty and socially excluded groups, reposing faith on the same model for financing key social sectors reflects serious lack of commitment by the global leaders towards equality, justice and climate change. The question will always remain on how to ensure accountability of private funding to the people at large and of the private capital towards human rights, labour rights and safeguarding the environment.

Click here for full statement.


For the CSO Response to FfD, click here.

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