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  • GCAP Statement on the ‘International Day for the Eradication of Poverty – 17 October’

    The ‘International Day for the Eradication of Poverty’ is very important for GCAP as it aligns with our global strategy and objective. The new GCAP with a renewed mandate commits itself to work towards not only eradicating poverty but to also fight rising inequality with new vigour and commitment.The presence of poverty, insecurity and inequalities continues to be a scandal in a world where knowledge and resources exist to ensure healthy and dignified lives for all.  While a few consume in an extremely unsustainable manner and accumulate soaring wealth, billions of others have no access to adequate food, safe drinking water, proper sanitation, housing, health, education, security and justice.Women, children and socially excluded people still comprise the vast majority of people living in poverty and face harsh discrimination - and often violence - on a daily basis.  It is also worrying that women lack economic empowerment and social protection and continue to live in a context that places them in a situation of vulnerability to violence patriarchy both in home and in society. Furthermore, today, marginalization is seen everywhere – from the poorest to the richest countries. Large-scale migration, displacements and the sharp increase in the number of refugees - resulting from poverty, conflicts and environmental degradation - is an alarming result of these trends. 

  • International Civil Society Call to Address Inequalities and Social Justice in Climate Policy

    October - November 2015

    SUMMARY

    Socioeconomic inequality is an integral part of the climate crisis, and must be addressed. Climate change disproportionately impacts poor and marginalized people and communities, who suffer climate impacts more severely, do not have the resources to respond or adapt, and lack the resources and influence to demand necessary changes. Climate change particularly impacts women and girls. Climate change is also a factor in the migration crisis. Climate change hurts the poor or marginalized more than the rich, compounding existing inequalities.

    Inequality is a key driver of the climate crisis. Inequality lies at the root of unsustainable behaviors. Inequality makes it socially acceptable for some people to have far more than others, and ties consumption to social status, promoting over-consumption. Our economic system also drives the climate crisis, as growth, short-term incentives and profit motives systematically contradict sustainability.

    Inequalities, both within and among nations, block agreements and pathways that could lead to sustainability. Within nations, socioeconomic inequalities reduce cultural diversity, depriving societies of potential models for more sustainable ways of life. Overwhelmed with problems caused by inequalities, societies cannot turn their energy towards the transition to sustainability. Between communities and nations who do not share common interests and responsibilities, agreement to address climate change is unlikely to be found. Socioeconomic inequality, by eroding trust and creating social fragmentation, blocks cooperation and joint problem-solving.

  • GCAP Solidarity with Nepal

    A call to prioritize marginalized and excluded people in Nepal

    After the earthquake in Nepal: Global Call to Action Against Poverty (GCAP) calls on the  international community to work with local civil society to reach and deliver aid to marginalised and excluded communities  in remote areas.

    “Even after a week, immediate relief has not reached remote areas” reports Daya Sagar Shrestha today, the Director of the NGO Federation of Nepal. “People in 10 districts are facing serious humanitarian challenges. The number of deaths has crossed over 5000 and hundreds of thousands of people have been wounded.”

    The Global Call to Action Against Poverty (GCAP) expresses wholehearted solidarity with the people of Nepal and hopes that the nation gains the strength to overcome this disaster. GCAP recognises the efforts of the Government of Nepal but the extent of the humanitarian crisis and limited resources there needs timely and quality support from international organizations.

    For full statement click here.

  • Release the five Women Activists now!

                   

     

    We condemn the illegal detention of young feminist activists in mainland China and call for their immediate release!

    Instead of reminding the world of the historic importance of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action and its own contribution and commitment to the same, the Chinese state chose to illegally detain five young feminist activists. In a clampdown, prominent activists, Li Tingting (also known as Maizi), Wei Tingting, Wang Man in Beijing, Wu Rongrong in Hangzhou, and Zheng Churang (also known as Datu) in Guangzhou, have been detained.

    The arrests were triggered by the five young women preparing stickers printed with sentences in Chinese such as “Stop sexual harassment, let safety be with you, me and her” and “Run police run, arrest those who commit sexual harassment!”, which they planned to distribute on 7 March in the streets of their cities.

  • In a Time of Ebola, Lobbying for Action on Poverty

    GCAP Liberia and a coalition of civil society leaders - representing women, youth, elderly, the disabled and democracy advocates - met with Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf in September to emphasise the urgency of achieving the Millennium Development Goals in 2015 and adopting a transformative Post-2015 sustainable development agenda.

    The meeting took place against the backdrop of the Ebola virus, which was first reported in Liberia in March 2014 and has since claimed some 2500 lives.

    "We are aware of the many challenges our President is facing in the fight against the killer Ebola virus and the slow economy growth," notes James Roberts of GCAP Liberia.  "Civil society actors will remain committed and persistent in influencing our President to push harder for a legitimate Post-2015 development agenda that is more inclusive and participatory."

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