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SDG Focus Areas & Indicators | Provide Feedback to the OWG

Following the completion of eight 'information sessions' on a variety of themes over the course of nearly one year, the Open Working Group on the Sustainable Development Goals has published a list of 19 “Focus Areas”, while another group commissioned by Ban Ki-moon has put out a list of possible SDG Indicators.

The OWG co-chairs (from Hungary and Kenya) write that the focus areas do not constitute a 'zero-draft' of the OWG's upcoming report, but that UN member states should use this document as a basis to identify SDGs and accompanying targets.

From now through 14 March, you can provide input on the overall document or specific focus areas on the WorldWeWant2015 portal. We're told that these submissions will be shared with the members of the Open Working Group.

Here's a complete list of the 19 Focus Areas:

Post-2015: The Istanbul Meeting

Fifty people from six continents representing 30 organisations adn platforms, incluing GCAP, gathered in Istanbul at the end of February, in a meeting convened by CIVICUS with the financial support of the United Nations, to discuss Post-2015 campaigning and explore possibilities of joint action.

CIVICUS Secretary-General Danny Sriskandarajah writes that the meetings "have the potential to transform the role of civil society in the post-2015 process".

Other participants and observers aren't so sure. They point to a lack of gender and regional balance in the room as well as an outcome document, a "meta-narrative" called The Istanbul Text, that does not seem to go far enough on many of the key Post-2015 issues identified by GCAP, Social Watch and others.

The Istanbul document envisions a "flotilla approach" in which different organisations have their own messages but are all pointing in the same direction.

Climate Change, Dams and Deforestation: The Bolivian Tragedy

By Carmen Capriles

I must share with you a little of the grief that we are suffering here in Bolivia over the past month.

Bolivia has endured the worst wet season in years, despite the fact that this has been caused by neither an El Nino or La Nina weather pattern.

58,000 families have already been affected, including 80% of the indigenous people living in the lowlands of the Amazonian forest.  At least 56 people have been killed.

Let's be clear. This is not just an act of Mother Nature. There are three major causes:

  • Climate Change
  • The Dams in Brazil
  • Deforestation

  

 

 

BRICS: The Club in the Club

The BRICS countries – Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa – risk losing their international credibility if they don't behave as responsible donors, writes GCAP Russia co-chair Vitaliy Kartamyshev.

These five countries produce about 20% of the world's economic output and account for a growing percentage of official development assistance. But it's clear that the BRIC have “fewer scruples” about how this aid impacts human rights, democracy, women and ethnic minorities.

At a minimum, the BRICS should adopt a set of guiding principles to ensure that they do not uphold political regimes that impoverish communities, exploit natural resources and undermine the development prospects of recipient countries.

In an article originally published by the Heinrich Boell Foundation as part of a series of G20 updates, Kartamyshev also argues that decisions by the BRICS, G20, G8 and other such clubs are poorly understood by the country's citizens and even the media. Civil society networks and movements have a role to play here – through education and adding to the political discourse.

Remembering MLK: We Have A Dream . . . That We Will Make A Reality

Martin Luther King Jr., the heralded minister who was born 85 years ago today and led the United States's civil rights movement until he was assassinated in 1968, is most remembered for his non-violent fight against racism.
 
"I have a dream," MLK told over 250,000 supporters from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, "that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the colour of their skin, but by the content of their character."
 
But Martin Luther King Jr. was also a powerful voice for peace and against poverty.
 
"Just as nonviolence exposed the ugliness of racial injustice," King said upon accepting the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964, "so must the infection and sickness of poverty be exposed and healed - not only its symptoms but its basic causes."
 
 
In a sermon entitled "Remaining Awake through a Great Revolution", given at the National Cathedral in Washington D.C.

GCAP Celebrates Sylvia Borren

A committed and passionate activist, GCAP celebrates the work and contributions of Sylvia Borren, who has stepped down as co-chair of the GCAP Global Council and chair of the GCAP Foundation.

While Sylvia no longer holds an official position with GCAP, we know that she will continue to accompany us, in all ways, always.

Watch Sylvia speak at the 2010 Stand Up Take Action rally in New York:

 

 

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