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G20 Updates and Consulations

The Civil G20 (C20) is asking for input on several G20 topics, including infrastructure, climate financing, education and growth.  The deadline though is 12 March.  

Below are links and information from the C20 Secretariat as well as a number of resources that we hope you find useful, including analysis, calenders, dossiers about the B20 and L20 and more.

From the C20

On the C20 Conversations site, you can help shape civil society’s recommendations to the G20 for a more inclusive and sustainable global economy.

The second round of discussion topics is now open for comment until Wednesday 12 March:

BRICS: The Club in the Club

The BRICS countries – Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa – risk losing their international credibility if they don't behave as responsible donors, writes GCAP Russia co-chair Vitaliy Kartamyshev.

These five countries produce about 20% of the world's economic output and account for a growing percentage of official development assistance. But it's clear that the BRIC have “fewer scruples” about how this aid impacts human rights, democracy, women and ethnic minorities.

At a minimum, the BRICS should adopt a set of guiding principles to ensure that they do not uphold political regimes that impoverish communities, exploit natural resources and undermine the development prospects of recipient countries.

In an article originally published by the Heinrich Boell Foundation as part of a series of G20 updates, Kartamyshev also argues that decisions by the BRICS, G20, G8 and other such clubs are poorly understood by the country's citizens and even the media. Civil society networks and movements have a role to play here – through education and adding to the political discourse.

G20 Verdicts - Civil Society Analysis of the 2013 Summit

While the issue of military action in Syria dominated G20 media coverage, the G20 has also announced policies that will impact people across the globe.  Here's a survey of civil society reactions, including three media releases and a radio interview by GCAP and the Feminist Task Force.

GCAP, FTF and ADA

G20 Update: 2013 Verdict - 3 Key Issues

REACTION TO G20 SUMMIT COMMUNIQUE
MEDIA RELEASE
06 SEPTEMBER 2013 ST. PETERSBURG, RUSSIA
VERDICT ON THE G20 SUMMIT – THREE KEY ISSUES
 
While the issue of military action in Syria has dominated G20 media coverage, the G20 has also announced policies – like a major tax avoidance initiative - that will impact people across the globe.

G20 Update: Russian Finance Minister Mocks Women

MEDIA RELEASE: "OLD BOYS NETWORK" STILL AT WORK AT G20
 
At the G20 Summit in St. Petersburg, Russian Finance Minister Anton Siluanov joked towards the end of a briefing on Financial Inclusion that “women consume a lot, so they need help with their financial management". At a summit where women are largely absent – and where the communiques hardly mention gender – Siluanov’s quip is
insightful.
 
Representation
 
The G20 – a self-selected club that calls itself the ‘world’s premiere forum for international economic cooperation’ – proudly notes that G20 countries represent 2/3 of the world’s population and 90% of global GDP.

G20 Update: Syria

Leaders from the world's richest countries traveled to St. Petersburg, Russia for the 2013 G20 Leaders Summit to discuss quantitative easing, tax policies, commodity markets and other financial matters. But the question of possible US military strikes against Syria overshadowed the meetings.

GCAP and the Feminist Task Force have issued a media release on the issue with several main points:

1.  Don't bomb Syria.  

2.  G20 countries and the United Nations must address the humanitarian crisis.  Over four million families have been displaced from their homes and 110,000 have died from conflict since the uprising against Syria's dictatorship started two and a half years ago.

3.  A political solution is needed.  And the G193 (the UN) is the proper forum to address this.

4.  Those responsible for using chemical weapons should be prosecuted in the International Criminal Court.

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